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Feb
8

Training for Snowboarding on a Total Gym GTS

Standing Squat and Side Stretch on a Total Gym GTS

(Watch the video)

Strengthen Your Snowboarding and Skiing Clients with these 7 Total Gym GTS Exercises.

It’s that time of the year again when our clients are looking at their calendars to find weekends where they can escape to remote locations to enjoy hours and hours of uninterrupted skiing and snowboarding on snow-laden mountain sides.

Although skiing and snowboarding are a blast, they are also very tough activities that can push you to the limit physically and mentally and we need to make sure that our clients know that and are prepared for what is coming. Oftentimes when clients think of preparing for activities such as snowboarding, it is natural for them to think that they just need to focus on their lower bodies as they start to train for their trip. However, as qualified fitness professionals, we know that the entire body needs to be trained throughout training program to help avoid injuries and deficiencies in other areas of the body. Remind your client (especially if they are new to snowboarding) that they will be pushed hard in various ways on their trip and that preparation is key to a fun and safe experience in the snow.

So let’s make sure that your clients have a wonderful and safe time on their trip by helping them master the following exercises on the GTS, so that their bodies and minds are ready for action.  Watch the video to see a demonstration of all these exercises.

Jump Squats

Disconnect the pulley from the glideboard and stow handles.  Have them push the glideboard half-way up the rails, straddle the rails and sit at the bottom edge facing away from the tower.  Place the feet toward the top of the squat stand positioned shoulder-width-apart.  Normally you would have them lie back on the glideboard to do a plyometric squat but we’re going to engage the core more with them sitting upright.  Hands can be by their side, stretched out in front, or beneath the butt.  Have them start in a deep squat and from this position, explosively jump up as high as they can with both feet and be sure that they land with both feet simultaneously on the squat stand. Repeat this sequence to complete the first rep and then repeat the exercise to complete the set. (2 Sets of 15 Reps).

Seated Two-Point Leg Swings

In the same starting position as above and with core engaged and sitting up nice and straight on the GTS, have them place the left foot on the squat stand. Perform a one legged squat on the left leg and as they come back up from the squat, they gently kick the right leg up as high as they can. Then repeat, but this time on their way back up from the squat, they kick the right leg out to the right side as wide as they can. After performing both kicks on one leg, that is considered one rep. Repeat this sequence as fluidly as possible by alternating the two directions on the leg for the desired number of total reps. Be sure to perform all reps on one side before switching and repeating with the opposite leg. (2 Sets of 10 Reps in Each Direction Per Leg).

Dips (Using Squat Stand)

From a standing position in front of the squat stand, facing away from the tower have them position hands behind them shoulder-width apart on the squat stand. Have them slightly walk away from the squat stand to incline legs out in front at a 45-degree angle. Straighten arms, keeping a little bend in the elbows to keep tension on the triceps and off elbow joints. Slowly bend elbows to lower the body toward the floor until elbows are at about a 90-degree angle. Be sure to keep the back close to the foot platform. Once they reach the bottom of the movement, have them press down to straighten elbows, returning to the starting position. This completes one rep. Keep the shoulders down as they lower and raise the body. Please note that legs can be slightly bent to modify this exercise. (2 Sets of 10 Reps).

Incline Push-Up (Using Squat Stand)

From a standing position in front of the squat stand, face towards the tower.  Place hands on the edge the foot platform, slightly wider than shoulder width and walk feet back so that the body is at a 45-degree angle. Have them stand on their tip-toes with arms and body straight. Then they will slowly lower their torso down in a controlled manner and push torso up until arms are extended to complete the first rep. (2 Sets of 15 reps).

Standing Squat & Side Stretch

Raise the rails to the highest level.  Have them begin in a standing position turned sideways from the tower and place right foot on the glideboard and left foot on the ground. Then they will need to slowly squat on the left foot so that the right foot is raising the board up towards the top of the GTS. As they come back up from the squat position the glideboard will lower into the start position. Repeat this sequence to complete the first rep and then repeat the exercise to complete the set. (2 Sets of 15 Reps with Each Leg).

Inverted Walking Plank

Remove the squat stand and with the glideboard closed have them come to a kneeling position on the glideboard, facing away from the tower. From there they place both hands on the floor below the lower rail base and get into a plank position.  Then they walk hands back towards the tower and as they do so, the glideboard should be sliding towards the tower. Once they walk in so far that they cannot go up anymore, then they slowly walk back down until they cannot go down any further. Repeat this sequence to complete the first rep and then repeat the exercise to complete the set. (2 Sets of 10 Reps).

Inverted Pike

Replace the squat stand and with the glideboard closed have them come to a kneeling position on the glideboard, facing away from the tower. Then have them place both hands on the squat stand with their head facing towards the ground. Place feet onto the bottom of glideboard, on tippy toes, with heels in the air. Their body should resemble an upside down letter “V” while in the starting position. While in this starting position, extend the full body outward so that they are completely straight, then bring the glideboard back in with feet to go back to the upside down letter “V”. Repeat this sequence to complete the first rep and then you repeat the exercise to complete the set. (2 Sets of 15 Reps).

About the Author

Mike Z. RobinsonMike Z. Robinson is the owner of the highly successful personal training facility, MZR Fitness as well as Mike Z. Robinson Enterprises which features & highlights a myriad of options to help fitness professionals grow their businesses and careers. Mike was the 2015 IDEA Personal Trainer of the Year, is the author of the E-Book: “Fitness Up, Everything Up”, and he is also a Media Spokesperson for both the American Council on Exercise & IDEA Health & Fitness Association.

Dec
13

5 Ways to Strengthen Legs with a Bad Back

How to Strengthen Legs on a Total Gym with a Bad Back

Modern technology can be a total paradox. On one hand technology makes life easier, on the other hand it has caused us to become more sedentary by allowing us to push buttons for work instead of performing manual labor. The human body was made to move, not remain seated all day. In another paradox, too much time spent NOT moving could be a possible cause of low back pain.

Low back pain is no fun and can have a negative impact on the quality of life. If one experiences pain for more than a couple of days in a row it could be a sign of a serious injury and it is important to see a medical professional for a proper diagnosis and treatment. However, like many people, instead of ongoing low back pain one may experience occasional periods of discomfort. When these flare-ups do occur don’t let them interrupt a normal exercise program.

It can be difficult to identify the specific cause of lower back pain; it could be related to a lack of mobility in the hips, or overall strength in the legs. The structure of the lower back, the lumbar and sacral segments of the spine, where they meet the bones of the pelvis, is designed to provide stability. The hips, on the other hand, are designed to be mobile. One possible cause of low back pain is that sitting for too long can cause muscle imbalances in the hips which can significantly restrict the range-of-motion of the joints, changing how they move.

When the hips lose mobility, the muscles and joints of the lower back which sit above the hips, will try to create the necessary motion for many movements. Since the lower back is not designed to have an excessive amount of motion this can be a potential mechanism of injury. If leg muscles aren’t that strong when lifting an object off of the floor, one is more likely to use the back muscles. Improving mobility of the hips and strengthening the legs can help improve overall function and possibly reduce the risk of damaging the lower back.

If your Client’s back is bothersome it may be a little uncomfortable to strengthen the legs (NOTE: discomfort is okay–it means the muscles are working. STOP immediately if a feel sharp pain is felt) but strengthening the lower body could reduce the amount of discomfort. In an effort to help reduce the risk of developing lower back pain and improve the ability to enjoy one’s favorite activities here are 6 ways to use a Total Gym to strengthen legs and improve hip mobility.

When standing upright gravity pulls the upper body into the hips which can help reduce motion in the joints. To strengthen legs without harming the back or making any existing discomfort worse, it is important to remove the effects of gravity. We can’t just turn gravity off, although that might be fun if we could, but we can place our body in different positions to significantly reduce and minimize the impact of gravity. A primary benefit of the Total Gym is that moving on an inclined plane reduces the effects of gravity which can immediately help improve hip mobility.

Total Gym Squat

Squat

NOTE:  Total Gym helps keep the lumbar spine stable when lying on the back.  This allows your client to focus on the muscles responsible for moving the hips, knees and feet. The closer the Total Gym is to the ground, the less gravity will effect the body. If the back is currently bothering them, have them start with the glideboard as low as possible and increase the height of the glideboard as they feel stronger and more comfortable.

Stationary Squats: Have them lie on their back with their feet hip-to-shoulder width apart, so that their toes are close to the top edge of the squat stand. Have them lower their bottom down until their knees are about 90 degrees. They hold that for 30 seconds or until they fatigue. They then rest for 30 seconds and repeat 2-to-3 times.TIP: As they hold the squat, have them press their feet into the board and squeeze those thighs to engage the muscles.

Outer Thigh Lifts. Have them lie on their right side with their right leg straight and their right foot pressed into the squat stand.  Have them lift their left leg up in the air so that both legs are about 6-to-8 inches apart and hold for 3-to-5 seconds before slowly lowering  back down. Repeat for 10-to-12 reps and switch sides, rest 45 sec. after both sides, complete

Total Gym Sprinter Start

Sprinter Start

2-to-3 sets.

Sprinter Start. Have them kneel on the glideboard on their hands and knees so that they are facing the top of the Total Gym and their feet are close to the squat stand.  Have them place their right foot on the squat stand and keep their left knee under their hip.  Have them tighten their abs as they push their right foot into the board to move you closer to the top and return to the bottom slowly.  10-to-12 reps and switch legs, rest 45 seconds and repeat 2-to-3 times.

Step-ups. Set the rails on the lowest level.  Have them stand facing the bottom of the Total Gym so that their one foot can step up on to the glideboard pressing their foot down to move the glildeboard closer to the bottom, which will help it remain stable during the exercise.  They can pause for 2-to-3 seconds before slowly lowering themselves down.  Repeat for 8-to-10 reps, switch sides to alternate legs, rest for 45 seconds after both legs and repeat for 2-to-3 sets.

Step Up

Step Up

Squats. Have them lie on the glideboard with their feet on the squat stand so that their toes are close to the top.  Have them squat down for a 3-count, pause for 1 sec. then push back to the top. Repeat for 12-to-15 reps, rest for 1 min. and complete 2-to-3 sets

If these exercises are done at least 2-to-3 times a week there is a good chance that you will see improvement in the strength of the legs and reduce risk of low back pain.

Here’s a final paradox; yes, exercising when the back is bothersome can be uncomfortable but not exercising can actually make the discomfort worse which can turn a minor problem into a major one. Even after almost twenty years of being a personal trainer and group fitness instructor I may not know what causes low-back pain, but I do know that improving strength and flexibility in the lower body can help reduce the risk of letting it impact quality of life.

About the Author

Pete McCallPete McCall is an educator, performance coach, personal trainer, author, consultant and host of the All About Fitness podcast. Based in San Diego, CA, Pete holds a master’s degree in exercise science and health promotion, completed a Fellowship in Applied Functional Science with the Gray Institute, is a Certified Personal Trainer and a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist. Currently Pete is an adjunct faculty in exercise science at Mesa College, a master trainer for Core Health and Fitness, a blogger and content contributor for the American Council on Exercise (ACE) and online instructor for the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM).

Consulting with organizations like the World Bank, Reebok, 24-Hour Fitness, Core Health & Fitness, the Institute of Motion and Fit Pro, Pete has experience identifying needs and delivering solutions. Frequently quoted as a fitness expert in publications such as The New York Times, Washington Post, U-T San Diego, SELF, Glamour, and Shape Magazine and featured as a fitness expert for TV news outlets including WRC-NBC (DC), Fox News, Fox 5 San Diego, and NBC7 San Diego, Pete is a sought-after media resource for accurate, in-depth insight on how to get results from exercise. www.petemccallfitness.com

 

Nov
1

Trainers – How to Cue for Breathing

Cuing for breathing

Top Tips on Teaching When and How to Breathe.

Teaching class participants how and when to breathe during exercise can be one of the most challenging areas of our training sessions. I find that as a trainer myself, most people are very shallow breathers and sometimes if they focus too much on their technique they forget to breathe completely!

Effective ways to keep breathing

The one exception where the breathing pattern may change in weight lifting would be in the overhead press. Here it makes more sense to inhale: expand the diaphragm as you press the bar up.  Otherwise, try these breathing tips.

1. Breathing along WITH your clients/members helps tremendously.  They can hear your breath and follow along easily.

2. I do hear some trainers telling their clients to “blow out the candle” as they are forcing a movement which also works well.

3. It is standard with resistance training or weight lifting to exhale during the exertion phase. I always remind my clients to think of the letter “E” for Exertion and Exhalation.

4. In a functional setting (higher than 15 reps), it is best to just breathe naturally but I find that when a client has too much to focus on ie., breathing, technique and form etc., it can be overwhelming. I watch their lips and when I see them clamped shut, I literally say, “please open your mouth and B-R-E-A-T-H-E.”

Importance of the diaphragm

If we want to truly help our class participants achieve overall health and function, we must take a look at the importance of the diaphragm. Most people, being shallow breathers, have never learned how to breathe effectively. Breathing with efficient oxygen saturation with full diaphragmatic involvement is the cornerstone of health and well-being. Whatever muscles we are strengthening, the ideal breathing motor patterns is crucial. The diaphragm must be the prime mover in the breathing process. Because of the lumbar spinal attachments of the diaphragm, stability and mobility in and around the thoracic and lumbar spine is vital.

Through naturopathy, I am able to help my clients understand the importance of breathing even more. I explain that the more oxygen you get into the body, the more carbon dioxide poison you will eliminate from the body. When oxygen replaces carbon dioxide, there will be greater purification of the blood, cells and organs of the body, for better health and stronger results from training efforts.

Have you ever experienced suffering from “a stitch” when warming up in a jog or a run? What a stitch really is, is a sign of unused lung air sacs trying to open and receive fresh air that you are pumping in. The sharp pain is due to the air forcing these cells apart. Continuing to breathe deeply will help and the distress will pass. At this point, the unused lung cells become reactivated. Teaching our older and beginner exercisers how to use their diaphragm to breathe deeply will help them avoid these discomforts and faulty movement patterns while training.

Diaphragmatic breathing has a tranquilizing rhythm, stimulates your circulation and helps rejuvenate the body. This type of breathing is a natural method designed for the body, yet if not taught how to use the diaphragm properly, many people have trouble. We commonly see too much chest breathing as opposed to breathing deep into the diaphragm.  I use the following exercise to help my clients use their diaphragm more efficiently.

Try this warm up breathing exercise

> Have your clients stand and locate their diaphragm by placing one hand at their waistline and the other hand up with their palm facing their mouth.

> Ask them to blow imaginary dust off their palm, feeling a strong muscular contraction at their waist when they blow. This helps locate the diaphragm.

> Then to warm up and direct the focus to the breath, I often start a workout with them walking around the room on their toes while reaching high over their head.

> I ask them to raise their diaphragm as high as their strength will allow while still breathing deeply. I ask them to feel the chest and stomach muscles as they breathe deeply.

> After this, we bend over, drop the head below the heart, arms reaching towards the floor, compressing out every bit of old toxic, carbon dioxide-laden air.

This is a great way to set the tone for breathing during the workout and is a super lung cleanser. I find it also helps to rid their mind of stress they may be bringing to the workout.

On the other hand, Yoga breathing is very different. It is nose breathing and there are different types.  On of them, the Ujjayi breathing technique is best explained here.

Focusing on the breath is the best way to connect with your body before a workout. As trainers, we all have our own unique way of getting our clients to connect with the breath. Whatever your preference is, my best advice is to include some breathing exercises in a warm up.

“Just by paying attention to breathing, you can access a level of relaxation and health that will benefit every area of your life.” Deepak Chopra 

About the Author

Frances Michaelson

Frances Michaelson is President of exercise equipment company Muscle Up Inc., a licensed Naturopath and a Personal Trainer. She is passionate about helping people attain optimal health through proper diet and exercise. A self-described health-o-holic, she motivates others to move well and eat well to keep their bodies’ cells dancing and singing.

Based in the West Island of Montreal, Frances is a frequent conference presenter, author of BYOB: Bring Your Own Band and Replenish, Regenerate and Rebuild Your Cells. She blogs for Total Gym and is a regular contributor to IHRSA’s “Ask an Industry Leader.” With her broad knowledge base and over three decades of experience, she is widely recognized as a leader in the health and fitness field. Frances is committed to helping others make positive lifestyle choices that create stronger bodies, healthier minds and more fulfilling lives.

Apr
27

Open and Closed Chain Exercises on Total Gym

When to Use Open or Closed Chain on Total Gym?

Simply put, open chain exercise is where one end is fixed while the other end is free. Raising the arm up overhead or knee extension are open chain exercises. A closed chain exercise is when both ends are fixed. For example, push-ups and squats are closed chain exercises. Open chain exercise is easier to implement when isolating a single joint. For example, the elbow joint is isolated with biceps curl and the knee is isolated with hamstring curls. In rehabilitation, when weight bearing, strength and range of motion are impaired or injury is acute, open chain exercises may be easier to implement. With that said, open chain exercises can place greater shear, stress, on a joint, making closed chain exercise more desirable.

Wide Rear Fly - Open Chain

Wide Rear Fly – Open Chain

Closed chain exercises increase joint stability, decrease acceleration forces, and increase muscular activity to help resist large forces. Due to nature of the exercise, closed chain exercises tend to incorporate more joints. For example, a squat involves movement at the ankle, knee and hip. A push up involves movements at the wrist, elbow and shoulder girdle. Due to increased muscular and joint activity in closed chain exercises, stability in a joint may be enhanced. Thus, in rehabilitation, closed chain exercise may be a more ideal exercise in clients with instability. Note instability may be present with swelling or post injury as in the case of a knee ligament tear.

If weight bearing is not restricted, squats may be an optimal way to help with stability and increase range of motion. In a fitness training, closed chain exercises are a great way to address a multitude of muscles in a small amount of time.

Lunge - Closed Chain

Basic Lunge – Closed Chain

Closed chain exercises can also provide a great way to increase weight bearing on to bones, which is important in the prevention of osteoporosis.

Understanding the Rationale

So when constructing your workout or rehab routine, what should you do more of…open chain exercise or closed chain exercise? Unfortunately, it is client dependent. However, if you can understand the why behind a philosophy then you can decide what exercises work for you. Note that most routines have a combination of open and closed chain exercise.  Here are some examples of exercises, general rationale and open or closed chain in nature.  To watch the exercises, click here.

Open.Closed Chain Exercises on Total Gym

About the Author

Elizabeth Leeds, DPTElizabeth Leeds, DPT, owner of Seaside Fitness and Wellness, combines her background in physical therapy, personal training and Pilates in her practice and teaching. As a pelvic floor physical therapist working at Comprehensive Therapy Services in San Diego, her passion for pregnancy and postpartum is seen in her mission to empower women with knowledge and understanding of their physical changes, and how to address them to prevent future issues. Additionally, Elizabeth is a Master Trainer and developer for Total Gym’s GRAVITY education.

Feb
24

5 Best Equipment Purchases for Your Gym or Studio

Top Exercise Platforms Your Club Should Have

by Mike Z. Robinson

As the owner, director, or manager of a fitness club, you constantly find it part of your daily duties to keep  costs down on purchases made for your facility and it’s no different when it comes to purchasing equipment. When you are looking at making an equipment purchase for your club, there are several things that you have to factor in before you make your investment such as the cost, how much space will it take up, how much use do you think your clientele will get out of it, will it create a buzz of intrigue with your clients, what is the return on investment, and how exactly can you create an additional stream of income by buying this equipment.  Wow, who knew that so many things would go into making a simple equipment purchase?

With so many things to factor in, it’s no wonder that so many owners, directors, and managers have such a difficult time trying to find the right pieces of equipment to purchase for their facility. But you’re in luck because you will not only find the top 5 pieces of equipment to purchase for your facility below, but you will also find the best ones to get the greatest amount of return on your investment.  These are not in any particular order.

Total Gym GTS – TTotal Gym GTS Bodyweight Inclinehis is a great piece of equipment because not only is the Total Gym GTS very convenient, affordable, and functional but it also can be an amazing additional stream of income as many facilities have created their own Total Gym workshops, 6-8-12 week training programs, or customized workout circuits to bring in more revenue. There are literally hundreds of exercises that you can perform on the Total Gym and your clients are guaranteed to like the variety that it provides to spice the workouts up and keep their muscles & minds engaged. Total Gym lives up to its name and provides full body workouts all within one location. Nothing on the market even compares.

TRX – A great piece of equipment that offers versatility and a huge return on your investment. You caTRXn purchase 20 of these for less than $5,000 and create in house monthly/quarterly TRX training programs that nets you a huge return on your investment and a healthy stream of income. TRX’s have become synonymous with gyms, clubs, and training facilities all over the world and members have come to expect to see them at their workout destination, so to say that you need one at your club would be an understatement.

RopesTraining Ropes – Simply put, training ropes are awesome! They came to the mainstream out of nowhere a few years back and took the industry by storm. Although they look very simple and innocent, they come with a lot of functionality and excitement that members love and hate at the same time. Training ropes allow your members to explore and be creative in their workouts. Some people embrace the challenge of seeing what they can come up with during their workout and some people will shy away from it. However, the people who shy away from being creative (and risking injury) will provide your club the opportunity to offer private training and increase its Personal Training revenue as other members will definitely be intrigued by the Training Ropes especially when they see them in action. Some members will want to play with the Training Ropes but won’t want to risk getting injured which opens the door wide open for your Personal Trainers.

Lebert Bars – Lebert Bars are another piece of equipment that has become synonymous with workout facLebertilities mainly because of the affordability, the fact that it does not take up a lot of space, and you can do countless exercises on them. Lebert Bars are extremely light weight but are solid enough to be able to work with members of all sizes. Just like all of the pieces of equipment above, this too can be another stream of income that can be built by creating customized groups classes that focus solely on using and highlighting the Lebert Bars. They have become increasingly popular over the years and that doesn’t seem to be changing anytime soon.  

rowerWater Rower – Fun, fun, fun! The Water Rower is an old concept with a new twist. Regular rowers have been around for a while but the Water Rower is still fairly new and has been wildly appealing to members who have had the opportunity to use them especially those from the older population. They are very easy to use, no impact, and there seems to be something motivating about the aesthetics of watching yourself and seeing how much force you are generating in the water with every pull. Water rowers are extremely functional and you can do an incredible variety of exercises on them. To create income out of the Water Rowers, you can create competitions, tournaments, training programs, and contests.

If you look at the common denominator among all of the equipment choices listed above, you will see the trend that they are all pieces that focus on not only providing a lot of variety from its usage but also providing a great opportunity to create another stream of income and boost revenue. When you make your purchases for your club, always remember that you are making an investment and treat it like an investment. Confirm that you will not only be able to make your money back but that you will also be able to boost revenue simultaneously and immediately. There are obviously a lot of great pieces of equipment on the market and the list above simply should just help you on your quest to purchase new equipment. However, just remember that if you do want to get something that is not listed above, just make sure that you do factor in the cost, how much space will it take up, how much use do you think your clientele will get out of it, will it create a buzz of intrigue with your clients, what is the return on investment, and how exactly can you create an additional stream of income by buying this equipment.

About the Author

Mike Z. RobinsonMike Z. Robinson is the owner of the highly successful personal training facility, MZR Fitness as well as Mike Z. Robinson Enterprises which features & highlights a myriad of options to help fitness professionals grow their businesses and careers. Mike was the 2015 IDEA Personal Trainer of the Year, is the author of the E-Book: “Fitness Up, Everything Up”, and he is also a Media Spokesperson for both the American Council on Exercise & IDEA Health & Fitness Association.

Jan
22

How to Retain Gym Members with Circuit Training on Total Gym

Refresh your class in 2016 and retain members with circuit training

Every year, January starts with a great rush in the fitness industry as gym-goers burst with enthusiasm and New Year resolutions, but by mid March have they lost their interest?

A Total Gym/GRAVITY class is a  fresh way to keep your members engaged and interested.  The fun factor, rapid results and the health benefits of a half hour – 45 minute functional total body workout,  can maintain long-term loyalty and provide enjoyment that will keep members coming back through to next January.

Keeping a choreographed Total Gym/GRAVITY class exciting may sometimes be challenging.  Fun new exercises and workout tips keep your exercise repertoire stimulating and your members happier.  Here’s an easy circuit-style workout that new class participants or regular members will enjoy.  And it’s simple to implement!GTSinuse_300DPI

Set Up – What you Will Need:

Ideally, you will need eight GTS units (you can add more rounds if you don’t have enough units). Take a little bit of time to write or print out the exercises for each station and stick them to the tower on the unit. Even though you will likely demo the exercises before each round, by the time the participant gets to any given station they may have forgotten, so a visual cue will be very helpful.   To familiarize yourself with the exercises please refer to your Foundation Manual (that you received when you took the course).

How Long the Workout Should Last:

  • 45 seconds per station,
  • 15 seconds transition time = 8 minutes per round.
  • 4 Rounds = 32 minute workout.
  • (Add warm-up and/or cool-down of 10 minutes = 42 minutes total)

How to Configure Your GTS Machine Stations:

  • Station 1: Set up for Squat – no pulley
  • Station 2: Set up for Biceps
  • Station 3: Set up for Torso Rotation – use Adjustable Glideboard
  • Station 4: Set up for Hamstring Curl
  • Station 5: Set up for Row
  • Station 6: Set up for Chest
  • Station 7: Set up for Triceps
  • Station 8: Set up for Overhead Press – with Press Bar

Round 1

Station 1: Regular Squats

Station 2: Bilateral Bicep Curls – Palms Facing Up

Station 3: Torso Rotation – Kneeling – Left side

Station 4: Bilateral Hamstring Curl

Station 5: Low Row – Palms Facing Each Other

Station 6: Chest Press – Palms Facing Down

Station 7: Tricep Press Down (Lying Supine)

Station 8: Overhead Press

Round 2

Station 1: Squat Jumps

Station 2: Bilateral Bicep Curls – Palms Facing Each Other (Hammer Curls)

Station 3: Torso Rotation – Kneeling – Right side

Station 4: Bilateral Hamstring Curl with Sit-up or Crunch

Station 5: High Row – Palms Facing Down

Station 6: Front Raise – Palms Facing Up

Station 7: Overhead Triceps Press (Lying Supine)

Station 8: Plyometric Overhead Press

Round 3

Station 1: Unilateral Squat Jumps (One Leg, Alternating)

Station 2: Biceps Static Equilibrium

Station 3: Torso Rotation Oblique Small Twists – Kneeling – Right Side

Station 4: Unilateral Hamstring Curl – Right Leg

Station 5: Surfer (Kneeling Optional)

Station 6: Chest Fly

Station 7: Overhead Pull Down – (Lying Supine)

Station 8: Unilateral Press – Right arm

Round 4

Station 1: Plié Squat Jumps

Station 2: Unilateral Switching Bicep Curls

Station 3: Torso Rotation Oblique Small Twists – Kneeling – Left side

Station 4: Unilateral Hamstring Curl – Left leg

Station 5: Row (cable unhooked from glideboard)

Station 6: Unilateral Chest Press – Static Equilibrium

Station 7: Lying Supine – Iron Cross

Station 8: Unilateral Press – Left arm

Hot Tips:

For a newer group, you may need to add more time to each station and reduce number of rounds as there is more necessary explanation and setup/help. So instead of 45 seconds with a 15-second rest, you can increase to one minute of exercise and 30 seconds of rest/transition.

Stay tuned for more exciting ideas for your classes.

 

Apr
21

GETTING BACK IN THE PILOT’S SEAT WITH GRAVITY

Mission Valley ymca images- GRAVITY- SMALLNancy Vaughan used to be a regular at the gym until she began experiencing constant hip pain and had to stop working out. A private pilot for 30 years, she could no longer get in and out of a plane; she couldn’t event go to Padres or Chargers games because she couldn’t walk the stadium stairs without pain.

Then Nancy had total hip replacement surgery, but her road to recovery only started there…

“After hip replacement surgery, your body mechanics are off – you have a foreign object in your leg – suddenly your bad leg is your good leg but you’re not sure how to move. You’re terrified of doing something wrong, so you don’t do anything.

I experienced severe muscle pain in my lower back after walking only a few steps.  I’d stopped working out prior to my surgery and had become deconditioned and I realized that I needed to get back into shape – I needed to take control of my pain”

So Nancy joined the Mission Valley YMCA

“I started aqua exercise classes with an instructor that specialized in pre and post-operative patients. Once I felt I could complete a workout in the gym, I joined the ‘Team Challenge’ where I got a free pass to try GRAVITY using the Total Gym GTS  – I pretty much stopped everything else after that first class. Now I attend GRAVITY classes as often as I can. I go four to five days a week; sometimes I even go every day. The instructors are all great and I love the variety of classes offered – some emphasize stretching, some posture and balance, others focus on building core strength and overall muscle – but they’re all fun – and it works!

Working out on the Total Gym GTS has helped me regain strength in my legs, strengthen my core and has greatly improved my posture. I feel like I’m standing taller and straighter than before.

Even though my physician had sent me to physical therapy, it was GRAVITY and working out with Total Gym equipment that saved my life.

Now I have the freedom to get up and go do whatever I want. I knew after my surgery, that once I was able to climb back into my airplane, I could fly it and GRAVITY helped me feel more confident about trying it.  And of course it helped me to have the energy to be able to do the physical things that go along with recreational flying, like pulling the plane out of the hangar, loading it up, putting fuel into it, and then putting it away and unloading it at the end of the day.

Part of the recovery process from any total joint replacement is getting people back to good conditioning – I believe if there had been a Total Gym machine available to me during my post-op physical therapy, I would have been six months ahead of the game. I personally don’t feel there is any reason physical therapy clinics can’t run their own GRAVITY classes – it’s the missing link!  Total Gym should be a part of any physical rehab program.”

Total Gym and GRAVITY allowed me to get back to my active lifestyle pain free with confidence!

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